The Directional Shaking of the Lulav: Bible, Mysticism, and Religious Polemics

Yaakov Jaffe traces the origins and evolution of the custom to shake the lulav in different directions.

Kohelet: Seeking to Uncover and Bury

Shlomo Zuckier seeks and uncovers rabbinic-Biblical intertextuality.

Two Pieces on Terumah

The poetry of the Mishkan: Abe Mezrich mines Parshat Terumah for its poetic potential.

Guilt and Shame Cultures in the Thought of Rabbi Jonathan Sacks

Marc Eichenbaum explores the idea of guilt and shame cultures in the thought of Rabbi Jonathan Sacks z"tl, which provides a novel interpretation of Torah and a powerful lesson for contemporary society.

Is a Modern Orthodox Humash Even Possible?

Jack Bieler continues the conversation about the need for and feasibility of a Modern Orthodox humash.

Re-reading Bereishit: A Review of David Fohrman’s New Book

Tammy Jacobowitz reviews David Forman's latest book, a companion to Sefer Bereishit, and finds engaging, instructive literary analysis that pulls new insights from familiar stories.

Incensed by Coronavirus: Prayer and Ketoret in Times of Epidemic

Dr. Eddie Reichman, an ER doctor on the front lines of fighting Coronavirus, and an expert in the history of halakhah and medicine, shares a unique perspective on history of combatting plagues in the Jewish tradition.

The Nazir and the Priest

Yoni Nouriel examines an episode in the Talmud where Shimon Ha-Tzadik describes his encounter with an impure Nazir.

Hendiadys in the Pre-Shofar Acrostic Prayer: An Introduction to an Overlooked Principle of Biblical...

In unpacking the meaning of a tricky verse from Eikhah that we say as part of the Shofar service on Rosh Hashanah, Mitchell First introduces us to the literary principle called hendiadys, which can help us understand various phrases throughout Tanakh.

Why Doesn’t Abraham Get to Enjoy the Weekend?

Ezra Sivan compares biblical covenants, the all-important circumcision of Abraham and Shabbat