“Filling In” and “The Poet of Auschwitz”

Two new poems by Temima Weissmann address national calamities, both past and present.

Buying Jewish Whiskey

Last year, Nathan B. Oman, a Latter-day Saint and law professor, bought hametz from the members of Chaim Saiman’s synagogue before Passover. This is his story—a profound meditation on the nature of religious law and legal fiction — with an introduction by Chaim Saiman.

Learning To Let Go

A new poem by Janet Kirchheimer, on losing a father.

Poets Are Purim Jews: On Contemporary Poetry’s Inexplicable Obsession with the Ordinary 

Poet Yehoshua November notices a defining characteristic of contemporary poetry—fixation on the ordinary. In light of Hasidic theology, November argues that appreciation for the holiness of the ordinary underlies Megillat Esther and the celebration of Purim.

Thoughts on a Death

In this personal reflection, Phil Lieberman addresses the unique pain that accompanies the loss of an abusive parent and considers the uneasy coherence of this pain with Jewish traditions of mourning.

The Agunah

Talya Jankovits presents a chilling narrative on the tragedy of a woman chained to her marriage.

Two Poems from Knock-knock 

These poems present a reflection on mortality and memories.

The Secret Quietness

These poems present Dephy's reflections on memories, relationships, and the self.

Poems for a World Built, Destroyed, and Rebuilt

Six new poems by Elhanan Nir—published here with English translation and annotation—capture the grief and discontinuity of this moment.

“Lu Yehi”: Between Fragility and Hope

In this thoughtful essay, Cypess reflects on the melody that is carrying Israel in the wake of October 7th.