When the Sea Parted

As we approach Pesach, Bruce Black's latest poem vividly retells the splitting of the sea.

From Storage Cities to the Tabernacle: Building a New Civilization

Daniel Berkove shows how parallels between the building of the Tabernacle and the building of Pharaoh's storage cities shed light on the differences between civilizations that those structures represent.

Miriam’s Song and the Persistence of Music in Dark Times

Why did the women bring musical instruments out of Egypt? In her first Lehrhaus article, musicologist Rebecca Cypess draws a fascinating historical analogy between biblical and African-American slavery to shed light on the Exodus in Jewish tradition.

Frum and Free? Passover and Jewish Views on Liberty

Aton Holzer offers a novel re-reading of the Seder, arguing that it reflects and recreates four types of liberty that can be found in the Exodus narrative, as well as a fifth form of freedom.

Imagining Passover

As we prepare for Passover, enjoy these three poems by Bruce Black meditating on the past, present, and future of our Exodus.

The Lonely Seder, Take Two

As another Pesach in isolation approaches, Will Friedman examines how Rabbinic texts take solo sedarim into account.

Seinfeld at Your Seder

Esther Lindell reviews “The Haggadah about Nothing,” Rabbi Sam Reinstein’s not-too-serious exploration of how the Haggadah relates to Seinfeld, the ever-popular 90s sitcom.

Does Hashem Wear Pyjamas? On The Unacknowledged Educators Of Seder Night

As we approach the Seder, Joe Wolfson invites us to consider how children’s questions help adults appreciate the true meaning of Pesach.

The Seder is Anything but Orderly

Why is the Haggadah such a disorganized text? Lehrhaus editor Yosef Lindell offers a strikingly novel approach to the dynamic nature of the Passover seder.

Holidays Reimagined: From Pesah To Purim To Post-Hurban Pesah

Shimon Laufer examines how Rabbinic understanding of the holiday of Passover influenced the holiday of Purim, and how one of the oldest manuscripts of the Mishnah hints that the converse may be true as well.