20/20 vision for hilkhot Shabbat: A Glance at Rav Yosef Zvi Rimon’s Newest Sefer

In our saturated environment, can any contemporary work on hilkhot Shabbat break new ground? Ezra Schwartz explains that Rav Rimon's newest work does precisely this.

The Next Women’s Siyum ha-Shas

Concluding our series on the recent Siyum ha-Shas, Channa Lockshin Bob wonders: What do we want the next Women's Siyum ha-Shas to look like?

The Balabatish Daf Yomi Revolution

How did daf yomi evolve from a yeshiva-centered program to one focused on the working Jew? Zev Eleff offers a historical overview of the daf yomi revolution.

Imagining Ourselves Into the Beit Midrash

Sara Tillinger Wolkenfeld offers a reflection on the role of imagination in bringing about the recent women's Siyyum ha-Shas.

Between Aveilut and Clinical Social Work: Interdisciplinary Reflections

Noah Marlowe offers a personal reflection on the experience of simultaneously studying Hilkhot Aveilut and coping with loss from a clinical social work perspective. He explores the similarities and differences between the two lenses and how they could each benefit from being in conversation with each other.

From Madison Square Garden to MetLife Stadium: Transformations in Daf Yomi Siyumim

Elli Fischer looks back at 30 years of Daf Yomi celebrations.

The Fourth Chapter of Avot as an extended reflection on Epicurean Philosophy

In the spirit of Hanukkah, Yaakov Jaffe offers an intriguing thesis tying together a series of Mishnayot in the fourth chapter of Pirkei Avot: they are all responding to various aspects of Epicurean philosophy.

Reish Lakish and Rabbi Yohanan on the Power of Repentance: A Reappraisal

How does Reish Lakish’s classic view of repentance help to account for the tragic dissolution of his relationship with Rabbi Yohanan?

Overnight Eggs and the Evolution of Humrah

Jeremy Brown considers the deeper significance of kashrut organizations' new humrah regarding eggs that were left out overnight.

Rabbinic Moral Psychology

Chaim Trachtman explores the relationship between moral instincts and rational thinking in Rabbinic Psychology.

EDITOR PICKS