When God Appeases Man: Yom Kippur in a Time of Exile

Yom Kippur marks the end of an 11 week period when thematic haftarot about the destruction of the Temple, consolation following its loss, and repentance replace haftarot connected to the weekly Torah reading. What can this grouping teach us about the nature of forgiveness and reconciliation? Hannah Abrams explains.

“I Would Soar to the Sphere of Heaven”: Aleph and “I” in a Tishah...

In advance of Tisha Be-Av, Tzvi Novick annotates and interprets the kinnah of a’adeh ad hug shamayim by the master poet R. Eleazar ha-Kalir, unlocking its complex acrostic to determine who its speaker is meant to be.

How Halakhah Changes: From Nahem to the “Tisha be-Av Kumzitz”

Chaim Saiman on halakhic change and the observance of Tisha Be-Av.

Can We Cancel Tishah Be-Av? The “Four Fasts” in Light of the Miracle of the...

Shimshon Nadel examines the question of whether we should continue to fast on Tishah Be-Av in light of the existence of the Modern State of Israel.

Kamtza and Bar Kamtza in the Age of Cancel Culture

The Talmudic story of Kamtza and Bar Kamtza is often used to highlight the destructive consequences of baseless hatred. In an intriguing reading, David Hellman suggests that the hatred that motivated the tale’s participants is more complex than meets the eye.

Laughter in the Face of Tragedy: The Enduring Resistance of Rabbi Akiva

Miriam Zami’s essay, runner-up to Hadar's annual Ateret Zvi Prize, uncovers the political and theological resistance of Rabbi Akiva’s laughter in the wake of the destruction of the Temple.