A Time for Rain

At what point in Jewish thought does artificial intelligence go too far? In this short story, Olga Lempert writes about a world where humanity itself might be replaced by the machines they create

Revival of the Forgotten Talmud

Sefaria has recently published a new bilingual digital edition of Talmud Yerushalmi. Taking stock of this development, Zachary Rothblatt offers an erudite synthesis of the history of Yerushalmi.

The Downside of Digital Democratization: A Response to Zev Eleff

Sarah Rudolph responds to Zev Eleff's article on "Digital Democratization".

Digital Discourse and the Democratization of Jewish Learning

Zev Eleff draws on lessons of nineteenth century print culture to help grapple with the Digital Age.

Abraham and the 1960s – Technocracy and the Journey Inward

Sam Glauber examines Abraham's place in his society.

Shared Leadership: A Response to Ezra Schwartz and Nathaniel Helfgot

In response to recent articles by Ezra Schwartz and Nathaniel Helfgot on the issue of centralization, Jeffrey Fox offers a vision of collaborative, personalized pesak in the post-Covid era.

Sacred Training: Elevating the Hallowed Art of Healing 

Howard Apfel reviews Sacred Training: A Halakhic Guidebook for Medical Students and Residents.

Decentralization and Centralization: A COVID Tale of the Modern Orthodox Community

As the Covid-19 pandemic looks like it might be subsiding, Ezra Schwartz, a Rosh Yeshiva at Yeshiva University, incisively examines competing trends toward decentralization of synagogue life and centralization of halakhic decision-making that are reshaping the Modern Orthodox world.

The Hazon Ish Wasn’t Writing About Using Computers

Dan Margulies explains the Hazon Ish's discussion about the problem of using electricity on Shabbat, with implications for Zoom Sedarim.

Taking Responsibility For Halakhic Guidance: A Response to Ezra Schwartz

In this response to last week’s article by Ezra Schwartz, Nathaniel Helfgot wonders whether the new pandemic-fueled trend toward centralized halakhic decision-making overburdens the most learned rabbis and takes too much autonomy from the others.