A Modern Orthodox Hedgehog for a Postmodern World: Part 2

In part 1, Gil Perl argued that Modern Orthodox is in need of a Hedgehog Concept and put forward Or (la-)Goyim as a candidate for that role. In part 2, he details what this might look like in practice and why it would appeal to our youth in a post-modern world.

A Modern Orthodox Hedgehog for a Postmodern World: Part 1

Gil Perl argues that Modern Orthodox currently lacks a “Hedgehog Concept,” namely something at their core that they passionately believe they do better than anyone else in the world. He argues that Or Goyim, as articulated by 19th century luminaries like Netziv and Hirsch, is the Hedgehog concept that can engage Modern Orthodox Youth in a postmodern world.

The Tragic Heroes of Bratslav: R. Nathan Bratslaver on Dispute and Multiple Truths

Lehrhaus editor Yehuda Fogel asks: What does R. Nosson Bratslaver's understanding of controversy have to do with Hegel?

Rationalism, Mysticism, and the “Off-the-Derekh” Phenomenon

Gavi Kutliroff There is a popular misconception that Modern Orthodox teenagers abandon halakhic observance because of a pubescent pattern of rebellion and disdain...

Teaching Talmud in the 21st Century: A Student Voice

Dan Jutan, Dov Greenwood, and Meir Kerzner explore the fundamentals of Jewish Education.

Inside Joke: The Spiritual Genius of Rav Menachem Froman

Josh Rosenfeld delves into the world of Rabbi Menachem Froman.

The Voice and the Sword: A Meta-Narrative in Rashi

Dan Jutan locates a fascinating meta-narrative within Rashi's commentary.

Notes on the Conversation surrounding Faith Shattered and Restored / Post-Modern Orthodoxy.

Marc Dworkin re-examines the impact of Rav Shagar's thought on the English-speaking audience.

Prayer in an Age of Distraction

Zachary Truboff considers the experience of prayer, and what two recent publications on Tefillah emerging from the Religious Zionist community contribute.
neil gillman

Neil Gillman and the Postmodern Moment: A Student Reflects

William Plevan argues that by introducing the concepts of myth and second naiveté to Jewish theology, Neil Gillman captured the spirit of the burgeoning postmodern moment.