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Tag: Modern

Letter To The Editor: Responses To Tzvi Goldstein On Centrist Orthodoxy...

Tzvi Goldstein's recent piece on Centrist and Haredi Orthodoxy has generated many responses from our readers. Today we present two stimulating letters by R.A. Alpert and Yaakov Resnik, who examine Goldstein's analysis from the perspectives of Hirschian Torah im Derekh Eretz and his analysis of the underpinnings of the Haredi hashkafa, respectively.

Wicked

In this poetic tale from Marina Zilbergerts's recent poetry book You Were Adam (Wipf and Stock), a learned and passionate woman struggles with her yetser hara, nicknamed "Wicked." The yetser is imagined as a fantastic character who accompanies her through Jewish Toronto's banal suburbia. "Wicked '' is a sympathetic and tragic apikores who knows how to get her where it hurts, but he also speaks the truth. He is a careful social observer present with her at all times. From going on weekly shopping trips, being in shul, to more intimate moments, this demonic character becomes her unlikely friend. In an ironic twist, the lessons taught to her by her yetser help her embark on the path of repentance.

Was the Sotah Meant to be Innocent?

For Parshat Naso, Lehrhaus editor Yosef Lindell compares three twentieth-century rereadings of the Sotah ritual that make the passage more palatable to modern audiences.

Letters to the Editor: Shadal, Hazarat Ha-Shatz, and Modern Orthodox Outreach

Today, we share letters to the editor by Ephraim Chamiel, Steven Gotlib, and Moshe Kurtz.

Is Modern Orthodox Kiruv Possible?

Steven Gotlib explores Modern Orthodoxy’s strengths and weaknesses with regard to Kiruv.

Modern Orthodox Jews Should Be Trailblazers in Holocaust Education

As we commemorate Yom HaShoah, Shay Pilnik urges us to add a Modern Orthodox voice to a discourse increasingly dominated by secular perspectives.

A Modern Orthodox Hedgehog for a Postmodern World: Part 1

Gil Perl argues that Modern Orthodox currently lacks a “Hedgehog Concept,” namely something at their core that they passionately believe they do better than anyone else in the world. He argues that Or Goyim, as articulated by 19th century luminaries like Netziv and Hirsch, is the Hedgehog concept that can engage Modern Orthodox Youth in a postmodern world.

How Should a Diverse Urban Congregation Select a Siddur?

David Wolkenfeld ponders his synagogue's next choice in siddur.

Notes on the Conversation surrounding Faith Shattered and Restored / Post-Modern...

Marc Dworkin re-examines the impact of Rav Shagar's thought on the English-speaking audience.